ellenWetmore

News

I will see you all at the University Film and Video Association Conference in Las Cruces in July!

Ellen Wetmore is honored to be a 2017 Berkshire Taconic A.R.T Artist Fellow for her project proposal Dante's Inferno

Ellen Wetmore is honored to be a 2017 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellow in Film and Video

Ellen Wetmore is honored to be receive a 2017 University of Massachusetts Creative Economy Grant to explore entrepreneurship with artists in the Merrimack Valley

If you are in New Mexico in February, join artist Ellen Wetmore for an exhibition of New Mexico inspired drawings, curated by Joy Miller, at the Branigan Cultural Center in Las Cruces until March 24th, 2018.

Wetmore is honored to be included in Labors: An Exhibition Exploring the Complexities of Motherhood, curated by Kate Shannon at Ohio State Mansfield until March 23rd.

Wetmore is thrilled to be included in the 24th round of the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center's Art on the Marquee, opening reception on February 28th, work to screen through March 2018. with the work entitledFrom Boston to Santo Domingo

Original Marbled Drawings are available through Gallery Kayafas. Prints are available online at Society6.

This catalog of drawings is available by contacting Kayafas Gallery. There are 15 full color reproductions and a brief essay by Deb Santoro. 9" x 12".

Press:

Wetmore earns Massachusetts Cultural Council Film and Video Grant

Wetmore is a 2017 Massachusetts Cultural Council Film and Video Fellow

Wetmore creates program to help artists build business skills

A darkly comic mural using comic-book-style illustration makes surreal connections between mother, child, and breast; the last is clearly an entity unto itself. Cate McQuaid, The Boston Globe.

Her works comically deflate, poke fun at, and savor pregnancy and other bodily wonders and indignities. “I think about bodies and their gross physicality. How do you lighten that up?” Her work is both funny and vaguely creepy. “I think of humor as mitigating the atrociousness of everyday life.” Cate McQuaid, The Boston Globe